At-Risk

Resources for parents of at-risk and troubled teens.

Friday

15

April 2011

Support for Massachusetts Single Parents

by At-Risk.org Staff

Raising kids is much more difficult for single parents then for one who have support of other parent. Being single makes their task twice as hard, at least. Still, with a hard work and love for their children, they manage to bring up their kids just as well as other parents. However, single parents also need twice as much support so they could be equally successful.

There is lot of help, fortunately, for every single parent who is will to ask for it. Numerous support groups from Massachusetts can be very useful, where other parents led by professionals can be of great use. Single parents should stick together in order to help each other and for many other reasons. Who can understand a single parent better that the other one?

There are also a financial assistance and government grants and programs available to single parents. None of them should hesitate to use them, as they are there in order to preserve healthy families and help children’s needs. Some single parents restrain from asking for help as they see it as the sign of weakness and admitting defeat. This view on a problem is wrong, as they refuse to see that they have a starting disadvantage.

Even if you don’t need a financial help, other support is certainly welcome. There is a lot of stress in parenting, even if you are not a single parent or you have many other family members to count on. When a child enters a teen age, stress and pressure will grow even bigger. With your job and your own personal needs, you won’t be able to pay much needed attention to your kid as other parents can.

Resourses for single parents like books can teach you how to deal with stress and release it as much possible as you can. Discovering what causes most stress in your demanding duty of being a parent, can help you on focusing on aspect and lessening stress. When you release stress, you can better devote yourself to parenting and teaching your child, which will prevent problems in a future.

Don’t be afraid to ask your child to help, in household activities for example. This will be good for you and your child, too, give you time to spend together and leave you some time to yourself. Your child will teach responsibilities and will appreciate the hard situation you are in to. Still, remember that your child is still just a child and don’t take too much of his or her spear time.

 

At-Risk.org Staff